I've been workin' on the...

Discussion in 'Photos & Videos' started by roryglasgow, Feb 10, 2002.

  1. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    ...web page!

    I've been tinkering with it for a while and decided to upload some of it to my host. It's not complete, but I do have some new photos of the layout there.

    http://www.cox-internet.com/theglasgows

    Enjoy!

    -Rory
  2. Catt

    Catt Guest

    Lookin' good Rory.:D
  3. Drew1125

    Drew1125 Active Member

    Very nice Rory!
    I like the way you can click on the track plan, & see a picture of that area.
  4. Bob Collins

    Bob Collins Active Member

    Rory;

    Great page. Have a question, what method of controls do you use? Block wiring, DCC? If DCC what product do you use to set up your reverse loops?

    Bob
  5. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Bob,

    I use block control. The actual controls switches are those colorful little boxes that Atlas sells. It gets to be a bit of a nightmare whenever I want to put a second train on the loop while the other is heading the opposite direction... All those turnouts and polarities and cab selections!!! Oh my!!!! I've yet to pull it off without forgetting SOMETHING...usually to reset a turnout...CRAASSSH!!!!

    -Rory
  6. Bob Collins

    Bob Collins Active Member

    Rory;

    After a good deal of reading and input, especially from Gary, I have finally decided to go to DCC. It is the perfect time as I have all/most of my joiners dropped below the benchwork, so now need to sort them into probably three zones in addition to the two reverse loops I will have. It is sort of crazy trying to identify one of the loops as it entails a double crossover and actually has three tracks at the throat of the loop. I think I finally have it figured out. It has been one of those things that you look and look and finally the light bulb comes on, in my case rather dim, but on a bit none the less:D

    Bob
  7. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Well, I decided to go DCC before I even started this layout... But lack of funds prevented me from doing it. :) The Next Big Thing will be DCC!

    -Rory
  8. Bob Collins

    Bob Collins Active Member

    I think that early on I didn't have a very good appreciation for what I would be spending to get my "dream layout" up and operating, so other than the Woodland Scenics risers I have been very creful up to now to try to spend wisely. Now that I think I have a better understanding of the overall costs involved, I know better that it is costing me an arm and a leg, so I've just said " what the h---" and gone ahead and decided to do it the way I want and if the kids inheritance is involved, so be it:D

    I still am clueless about the costs involved with the scenery to complete the layout. I always read the fine print in the articles about scenery looking to see if anyone ever talks about "so much a square foot" or something like that, but have never spotted anything I thought might give me any idea what I still have to look forward to with those costs. I guess I must have about 175 sq ft of area to do scenery on, so it will not only be time consuming from the "artistic" standpoint but may have to be done in phases as money becomes available. Some of my young friends in the neightborhood aren't going to be too patient with me I'm afraid:)

    Bob
  9. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Bob,

    I'm currently on a very thin shoestring budget, but have managed to get quite a bit of scenery done. I take it a little at a time. Also, I collect whatever items/ingredients I think might be useful later whenever I can. Materials I collected for trees over a year ago got turned into bushes and hedges fairly recently.

    Now if you buy the pre-made stuff...like trees...it will cost a whole bunch. But you can buy lichen and that Woodland Scenics foliage stuff for fairly cheap and use twigs and dried weeds from your yard (or the ditch, or the vacant lot across the way...wherever). I'm always on the lookout for plants that might make good tree armatures!

    Also, I was able to cover all of the ground on my layout with one bag of WS Blended Turf (50 cu. in.). That's approximately 17 sq. ft. And that included redoing several portions. It all depends on how thickly you spread it. If you paint the subsurface a "dirt" color before applying the foam, you don't need as thick of a covering--the dirt patches will look natural showing through the grass. One 50 cubic inch bag of blended turf is about $6 MSRP. You might get about 20 sq. ft. out of one bag...

    I would suggest, though, putting down a layer of "dirt" colored foam in the more visible areas. It makes a striking difference over plain "grass."

    Get the grass down soon. It'll make a world of difference on the layout! You'll go from that spartan factory look to Scottish moors... Put a few clumps of trees here and there, and things will take another big step forward.

    And it's fun to experiment with scenery techniques. You know how I am about trees! :)

    -Rory
  10. Catt

    Catt Guest

    Bob,I'm a firm believer in doing things "on the cheap". The dirt on my layouts is just that ,dirt.

    My backyard is full of the stuff:D Since grass grows on dirt its the logical (and cheap) way to start.

    Besides that way you can go lightly with the green turf to start and go back and add more later.
  11. Bob Collins

    Bob Collins Active Member

    Thanks guys. All very interesting. I think the most expensive aspect of all this would be that I don't have a real clear picture in my mind about just the right look of the Scottish highlands, so I might need to travel over there and ask Errol (kettlestack) to show me around:D :D

    The comments about using "real" dirt is very interesting. What it reminded me of is that here in the Ozarks we have lots and lots of ROCKS. I think if a guy looked carefully you could probably find quite a few that would be very satisfactory to use on the layout.

    I assume that in the case of the dirt you fix it to the base with a matte just like you would for any other matrial you might be using. Do you filter the dirt you use with a strainer or anything like that?

    I'm getting fired up again. We'll see if I run into a brick wall whaen I get my DCC equipment and the diagrams look like Russian road maps:rolleyes: I don't know what it is with my weak mind, but I always have a terrible time witrh that stuff. I'll probably have to call out the cavalry to help me!!

    Bob
  12. sumpter250

    sumpter250 multiscale modelbuilder

    Rory,
    Nice site!!! I'm lucky I can get a picture posted, web sites are out of my league, at least for now. Besides, I'd have to give up modelbuilding time to learn how to do all the computer stuff.
    On the subject of "cheap", I've gone as far as recycling used chop sticks, from the local chinese eatery, into pine trees, and used candy apple sticks into pilings around the bridge piers in the inlet.
    The Rico station looks good in red and white.
    Pete.
  13. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Pete,

    Thanks. That's actually the second one of those kits that I've built. I painted the first one blue with white trim (I used some of the paint we used to paint my son's room). It was really nice. But I came home from work one day to discover that a giant (relative to the station's size) had invaded the layout and destroyed the station! I don't know the exact story...I couldn't get a direct answer from my then 3-year-old son, but apparently he was looking at it and dropped it. (But there was evidence that it was actually pulled apart.)

    Anyway, the pieces sat in a bag for a long time while I tried to figure out what to do. I decided that it couldn't be repaired. Then Hobby Lobby had several kits, including that one, on clearance. I soon found out why they were on clearance, though. The pieces were WARPED! I had a time trying to straighten everything out, but I finally succeeded. Now it's my favorite kit on the layout! :)

    -Rory
  14. rockislandmike

    rockislandmike Active Member

    Heh heh, turns out I'm a computer guy first, and only recently took up model railroading. So oft times I'll spend as much time updating my website as working on my layouts.
  15. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Mike,

    I used to work on my website a lot more. Then a couple of years ago...I dunno...I guess the excitement wore off. I've been wanting to make something that looked nice and had spiffy features. I used to have my website on a Windows NT server, so I was able to write my own CGI and ISAPI programs in Delphi to spiff things up a bit. But now I'm on a regular ISP, and I ain't got the fancy bells and whistles. With the exception of kinda mapping out the look of my index page in FrontPage Express, my web site was built the old-fashioned way: Notepad.exe.

    There are still a lot of little things I'd like to add...a lot of little tricks I'd like to play. In fact, I think I might go work on that some here in just a little bit! :)

    -Rory
  16. Catt

    Catt Guest

    Bob C. I just sift the dirt through a piece of window screen. I get lots of neat little rocks that way too.:D
  17. billk

    billk Active Member

    Catt - I've heard that it is advisable to go over "real dirt" with a strong magnet to eliminate any iron/steel particles that may be attracted to the motors in the locomotives. Any thoughts on that?

    BTW, this reminds me of a discussion a while back on sifting lawn mower clippings to get "real grass" - I made a test patch on a piece of fowm that's been sitting out in the garage for several months now - last time I checked it looked OK - still had its color, wasn't ferminting or anything. There was some discussion on it being a fire hazard, which I don't know ever resolved itself.
  18. rockislandmike

    rockislandmike Active Member

    I use Notepad for almost everything as well. The only exception being some of the longer documents (for example, in my website, the writeups on each of the railroads) which I keep in MSWord, as I find they're easier to work with that way.
  19. Gary Pfeil

    Gary Pfeil Active Member

    I also use dirt as one of the first steps in scenery construction. The first thing I do is bake it in an old toaster oven at 400 degrees for half an hour. This to kill whatever is lurking. Also dries it out for sifting purposes. I sift thru three sizes of sifters, and mostly use only the finest for dirt. The others can be handy for talus at the botton of cuts and so on. I have not gone over with a magnet, but this might be a good idea. The dirt winds up bonded real well, but you can never be too careful I guess. Another free scenic item is sawdust. No, I do not use it for grass, as was done in the fifties. Not too convincing. I mix it with earth colored latex paint and carpenters glue. It is then spread on the sub base. It stays somewhat soft for 24 hours, giving plenty of time to plant weeds without having to punch or drill holes. For weeds, I use mostly twine. Get appropriate colors, brown, tan and greens, take between 1 and a dozen strands, wrap masking tape around the bunch to hold it together, cut about 1/4 inch on either side of the tape (adjust to get height of weed you desire) then cut in half at the center of the tape. You now have two weeds to plant. I trim the tops of each strand so they are not all the same. After planting, you can drybrush highlighting colors.

    Gary
  20. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Well, I was adding a new border to the train pages and realized that I had a bad link to the border that supposed to be there to begin with! Of course, it worked fine for me because it was picking it up off my local web server... Oh, the joys of computers... :)

    http://www.cox-internet.com/theglasgows

    -Rory

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