Another dumb question

Discussion in 'FAQs' started by John Sneed, Apr 17, 2002.

  1. John Sneed

    John Sneed Member

    I plan on raising one track about 2" above the main base. I want to use risers to make the approach. Now the question. How do i cover the spaces between the risers? Use a cut out of the approach
    With wood or just cork? I work in a photo lad and get heavy cardboard. Would that work? Also how long of a flat length do I need before starting down the other side. I know I need 25"for each inch of rise. I know this is very basic, but there are no dumb questions,only dumb amswers.I'am not real sure about that, but it sounds good.
    John
  2. kettlestack

    kettlestack Member

    John, For N gauge I've used 1/4" 3ply plywood as a base with 12" between risers. It was Ok and inexpensive (Scotsman talking here!).
    Cardboard might work but I wouldn't expect it to be totally trouble free because if you use water based glue to secure either cork or ballast on it, it will warp like you wouldn't believe. Of couse it also depends on the distance between the risers (I'm thinking of Woodland Scenics" foam risers which are fairly close together.
    I haven't used multi levels in HO so I can't say anything about this.

    Errol
  3. billk

    billk Active Member

    How ya doin', John?
    I assume you're asking how to support the track between the risers, right? How far apart are the risers? You just need to make it rigid enough so that there's no sagging between the risers. Cork alone probably won't be enough.

    You need to make sure that your locomotives can handle pulling whatever size train you're running up your "hill". The one inch rise over 25 inches you mentioned is a 4% grade, which may be too steep for what you want to be able to do. A grade of 2% (1 inch rise over 50 inches) would be a whole lot better. (Unless you're running geared locomotives like Shays, that is, then the steeper, the better! Right Shamus?)

    As far as the length of the level track before you go down the other side, to make sure you won't get "high-centered" the length should be longer than the longest locomotive or rolling stock you plan on running.
  4. YakkoWarner

    YakkoWarner Member

    3/4" plywood? What are you running, prototypes? :eek:

    1/4" plywood will bear the weight of a 200lb man with supports spaced at 18". (a little bowing is present) I use 1/8" hardboard supported at 8" intervals for my N-scale layout, and I think it's overkill. Unless you are planning to walk on your own layout, ;) 1/4" plywood, supported at 10 to 12" intervals will be just fine for an HO scale train. Make sure your easments are gradual and your flats are longer than your longest car and you'll be just fine.
  5. billk

    billk Active Member

    Uhh - YakkoWarner, are you sure you're on the right thread - either I'm going blind or nobody said nuthin about 3/4" plywood.
    ;)
    You're right, though, anything over 1/4" is overkill if it is supported at 10-12" intervals. I think it must be a macho thing.;)
  6. YakkoWarner

    YakkoWarner Member

    -kettlestack

    I read 1/4 3ply and thought 3/4.

    My bad.:eek:
  7. Woodie

    Woodie Active Member

    risers

    John,

    I just used 1/4" balsawood, with risers every 6" or so, and wood glue to glue it together. You can cut/shape it with a hobby knife and sands down smooth very easily. It's strong and I've had no problems. Don't forget your transition to the level to the rise. Do a search in here on "incline" and you'll find some real good info.

    Attached Files:

  8. Woodie

    Woodie Active Member

    ........ and the scenery attaches nicely to the edged (just make the roadbed wide enough).

    Attached Files:

  9. Woodie

    Woodie Active Member

    ...... the same corner

    The same corner, as it is now. ( I flattened the scenery hill out, couldn't see the trains behind it.)

    Attached Files:

  10. kettlestack

    kettlestack Member

    It's OK Yakko, what between having "senior moments" and my not-too-good varifocal glasses I've been known to make posts in the wrong thread, let alone misread things!:D :D

    But the guys in here just shake their heads and say "there he goes again" :D

    Errol
  11. kettlestack

    kettlestack Member

    Woodie I like that colour scheme on the train in the last pic, but do all Aussie trains pull 3 G's on the curves? :)
    The ones around Perth don't, (at least not while I was there) but things might have changed in 44 yrs.

    Errol
  12. RI541

    RI541 Member

    I use Woodland Senics plaster cloth over my inclines and risers it seems to work ok as I bring it into the scenery base.

    I used 5 ply 1/2" sanded plywood for my benchwork,I guess that was over kill huh? Oh- Well it was what I had in the shop.
  13. John Sneed

    John Sneed Member

    risers

    Thanks for all the information on spaces between risers. My base is 3/4 plywood covered with blue wall board.I plan on useing the woodland senics risers. I like the idea of useing balsawood.It would be easy to work with and cut easier. Thanks Woodie.Useing that i may be able to save some money and make my own risers. Again thanks you all. You've once again showen how much we need and use the Gauge. John
  14. Woodie

    Woodie Active Member

    Errol,

    I don't like it actually, as a coloour scheme, however I wanted the setup. It was a scheme introduced in Victoria in the late 70's, and there is still rollingstock around with that scheme.

    Pulling 3G's?? Yep... and it's stationary too! I've mentioned in here before about my curves being too sharp and unrealistic.... that's the consequence. That one is 20" radius.

    John,

    Yeah... I found balsawood very easy to work with, especially when building elevated curves. During contruction, you can hold it all together with ordinary sewing pins, before glueing it together. It's also very easy to shave off the beginning of your incline to make the level surface meet nicely with the incline surface and "transition" the incline. It's also very easy to pull apart should you need to modify it once glued.
    However, ensure ALL the roadbed joins are sanded very smooth, otherwise you do get a bit of a bump. I did not use cork roadbed on the balsa. Just laid the track straight onto it, and again, very easy to pin the track down, without the need for a hammer. Once ballasted etc, the glue holds it in place anyway.
  15. Drew1125

    Drew1125 Active Member

    Woodie,
    Whether you like the paint scheme or not, I love seeing those pics of your layout!
    You do great work, my friend!
  16. Woodie

    Woodie Active Member

    Thanks Charlie :)

    I should have some new ones in a week or so. Have done quite a bit of work since I took the last ones. Trouble is borrowing a digital camera!
  17. RI541

    RI541 Member

    Woodie,

    Sounds like you and I have the same problems with curves and inclines. I've ripped up about a third of my lay-out to fix some of these problems. Maybe I should just go bowling:) :)
  18. Woodie

    Woodie Active Member

    Shane,

    I don't think you and I are the only ones in "that boat"! Others are around, but might not admit it! :eek:

    I had turnouts twisted into those curves, (to allow for extension of the layout), but have now pulled them all out. (The hammer was too close at hand one night). Gentle persuasion of the tracks etc got a little out of hand! :mad:

    Nothing under 30" radius next time. NOTHING.

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