Which brushless?

Discussion in 'RC Drifting and Setup' started by viet_ladin, Jan 17, 2007.

  1. viet_ladin

    viet_ladin Guest

    So which brushless motor are most people running, to drift? I'm thinking of buying a brushless, but I am so lost as to which one to purchase.
  2. jareb

    jareb Guest

    well any brushless setup will provide more power than the brushed motors can right now. You could easily get away with something like the novak supersport brushless setup, or if you wanted insane speed run when your not drifting you could use a 3.5R setup, probably the best way to decide which one youll like the best is to visit their website or contact their customer service dept. www.teamnovak.com there are other companies that make brushless setups too. Mamba, Tekin, LRP. So its hard to say which one is best for your setup. But here are some rules of thumb just in case you not up on motor tech just yet. Generally the higher the turn # on the motor means the more lowend torque youll get, the motor will have very strong power at low speeds but not very high power at high rpm, so the motor will accelerate quicker. And the lower the turn # the motor will produce more power in high rpm, usually these motor have higher rpm limits also which translates into higher top speeds, and the acceleration will not be as quick from low speeds. Now these are just guidelines when choosing a motor from the same manufacter. Brand x may have a 6.5 turn motor that has like 60,000 rev per minute and rev quicker than brand y's 4.5 turn motor that might only make 55,000 revs. Just research with the companies website and/or contact them over the phone. Also check out what the local racers are using in their touring cars, these guys always have the hotsetup for their area. All in all youll be very happy with any name brand brushless setup, they all boast more power and longer runtime than brushed motors do. You might want to check out Lithium Polymer or LiPo batteries as well, they are very costly but weigh less and crank out more voltage and longer runtimes as well.
    Also with drifting you need torque to intiate a drift (to break the tires loose to start the drift) but you can use a low turn motor like the 3.5R with shorter gearing to achieve the torque you need. Gearing is very important with any rc vehicle to get the most out of them. Shorter gearing means running a pinion gear with less teeth on it, like use a 16 tooth gear instead of the 20 tooth pinion for example. This makes it easier on the motor and also increases runtime. The car will get up to speed quicker than with a larger pinion but will have a lower top speed. But you dont need a 60 or 70 mph car in drifting, so gearing the car lower definitely helps, I used to drift my tamiya car with the stock 540 motor it came with. And those motors have very little power.
  3. viet_ladin

    viet_ladin Guest

    I ended up buying a novak 4.5. The power is insane, and i'm really happy. Stripped my spur gear tonight though, so I gotta go parts shopping tomorrow. How come, they don't make metal spur gears? I did a search, for my tt01d, and come up with only plastic gears.
  4. jareb

    jareb Guest

    the 4.5 is a really sweet motor setup, I think you may just have to get your gear clearance a little tighter. Usually stripped spurs are caused by either improper gear lash or debri getting caught in the gears. Believe it or not but I used metal spur gears when I had an 1/8 scale nitro truck and the plastic ones actually lasted longer, plus metal spurs make some weird harmonics and dont sound to pleasant. Also youll pay about 4 times as much for one if they even make it for you car. Have you tried setting the lash with the paper trick?
  5. viet_ladin

    viet_ladin Guest

    I don't even know what setting the lash means. I did open up the gearbox, and put some rubber O-rings on the spider gear, turning it into an lsd. Greased it up good, and put everything back together. Ran it last night, for a super long time with no problems so far. I'm still going to go buy extra spur gears, just to be safe. One thing that irritates me, is that I have no idea, on how to tune the suspension. I do pretty good, considering it's a tt01d suspension setup, except the cf upper deck. Sometimes, it understeers like crazy, and sometimes it oversteers. I'm sure, it must also be my driving, but do you have any suggestions?
  6. jareb

    jareb Guest

    The gear lash is the spacing between the pinion gear (which is the small you attach to the motor) and the spur gear (the large gear you stripped). When you get the new spur gear and install it loosen up the two screws that hold the motor in place. then place a piece of notebook paper in between the two gear (the pinion and the spur) now slide the motor snuggly towards the spur gear. Hold moderate pressure on the motor while you tighten the screws up that hold the motor. This is the easiest way to setup gear lash/mesh correctly. you shouldnt strip the gear anymore this way unless get a rock caught in between them. Oh Yeah remove the paper from between the gears after tightening the screws.
    Setup of you car can be somewhat difficult to explain so here goes.
    You can alter handling by changing spring rates, this is done by using softer or harder springs (they dont cost much and most hobby shops have them in stock for you car) Using softer spring in the front will make it turn better and decrease understeer but may cause oversteer if you use too soft of a spring. Using softer springs in the rear will make the car more stable and turning will be harder. Using harder springs will in the rear can cause better turn in and oversteer.
    Using harder springs all around will make the car react quicker to steering inputs and help prevent bottoming.
    Using softer springs all around will make the car feel as though it is slow to respond but will keep the car from loosing traction as easy, bottoming is more likely.
    Then there is shock fluid, Using heavy weight slows the reaction of the shocks to bumps and transferof weight, and is good for areas when your hitting large bumps or long corners.prevent chassis from bottoming also.
    Using light fluid will make the car react quickly to bumps and give better transition in short multiple corners.
    I suggest using tamiya med springs at first then just change either the front or rear to a softer spring to get the effect you need. Start out with something like 25wt silicone shock oil and then experiment with lighter or heavier oils. most of the guys get 25wt oil and then never change it You also have camber (which is the angle of the tire to the ground) It may not be adjustable on your car stock, but you can buy kits with adjustable control links to set camber to your own liking. I suggest 1.5 degrees of camber front and rear. You can set the camber a little higher in the rear if you having trouble sliding. 3degrees is the most Ive ever had to run.
    You can also fill the diff with heavy silicone fluid to make them act like a limited slip the heavier the fluid the more they resist spinning the inside tire.
    toe in is important to. just measure the front of the tires versus the rear of the tires and you have you toe in or toe out measurement. Toe in make the car more stabile but harder to turn. Toe out make oversteer more likely. Toe in is when the front of the tires are closer together then the back of the tires. toe out is the opposite. 0 toe in/out is usually pretty good for drifting unless the car is using rubber tires then toe out makes drifting a little easier. Usually touring car come with some toe in built into the rear tires and the front tires are adjustable through the turnbuckles. Make sure that both sides are adjusted evenly or youll get some funky steering, car will drift good in one direction but not the other. This should help you get started sorry about typing a book for a reply.

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