Tires

Discussion in 'RC Onroad Forum' started by danny_holtermann, Feb 12, 2004.

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  1. Where can I get some hard compound tires for drifting?
    Websites and places in wisconsin
  2. mastmec

    mastmec Member

    Check out Yokomo, they have RTR cars built for drifting.
  3. timrock

    timrock Active Member

    doesnt drifting mean total loss of control do to loss of traction of all tires?example;The car drifts in the direction the momentum carries it.

    are you guys talking about fish tailing where you can drive side ways,having traction to the front tires but not the rear drive wheels?
  4. mastmec

    mastmec Member

    Drifting is sort of power sliding around a corner but on the gas to keep it in line to make the corner without losing control.
  5. timrock

    timrock Active Member

    so that is just the `name` of it then.ok.it used be called fish tailing.
  6. mastmec

    mastmec Member

    It's not fishtailing, because you hold the slide all the way around the turn. You sort of fish tail at the beginning of the turn but just to get the rear of the car to swing out and slide the rest of the turn.
  7. timrock

    timrock Active Member

    thats what i call fish tailing.
  8. mastmec

    mastmec Member

    Fishtailing is sliding the rear of the car back and forth like a fishs tail in the water. To drift you simply turn to the outside of the turn then turn into the turn to unload the rear end to slide around the turn.
  9. timrock

    timrock Active Member

    you go side ways through the turn to keep you speed up right?
  10. mastmec

    mastmec Member

    It's more of a show off thing, you scrub too much speed by sliding, if your racing, drifting is not what you want to do, others will pass right by you.
  11. timrock

    timrock Active Member

    well in racing full cars with front wheel breaks,you hit a turn at high speed and break into the turn instead of slowing down to take the turn.all the wieght would then be transfered to the front tires and gives you more traction and control.

    what do you do if you race rc cars with only rear wheel breaks?
  12. mastmec

    mastmec Member

    You slow down only enough to make the turn without breaking traction. You can carry more speed through a turn rolling than sliding, this allows you to acellerate out of the turn faster without having to wait till traction returns from sliding.
  13. timrock

    timrock Active Member

    i think it is the opposite.as in dirt oval racing you slide around every time you turn.
  14. mastmec

    mastmec Member

    Are you talking full size outlaw racing(if that is what they are called, I think thats just a team name though) those are direct drive, locked diffs, they slide anytime they turn. R/C it works better the way I stated before, lap times don't lie.
  15. Where else can i get tires for drifting? Just tires
  16. mastmec

    mastmec Member

    You can run any hard compound rubber tires.
  17. timrock

    timrock Active Member

    no.in talking about RC dirt oval racing with differentials.they slide the rear end in every turn.so it is the opposite of what you think.
  18. mastmec

    mastmec Member

    It's been a long time since I've seen R/C dirt oval racing, we don't have it here, yet, I hope. But I used to race a big track, too big to slide the turns. That would be cool to see though.
    But in offroad racing, you sliding through a tight turn scrubs off valuable time. I've passed many of people sliding through turns (them sliding).
  19. mastmec

    mastmec Member

    And I've been pasted too if I loose traction and slide through the turn because it takes too long to hook back up.
  20. timrock

    timrock Active Member

    you can slide through a turn and come into the turn faster and pass the people slowing down to make the turn.the tighter the turn the harder it is to do.so if you dont have enough practice under your belt then slow down to make the turn to keep good time.

    it depends on one`s driving style also.what ever works the best for you.
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