Show your Artwork

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by shamus, Nov 24, 2001.

  1. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    I like doodling around on my Art package which is “Freehand9” as I cannot draw anything with a pencil and paper I have to rely on this program to express it.
    How many modellers in the gauge actually like to doodle and draw with pencil and paper?, or use the computer like myself.
    Why not show your results here for all to see.
    Here's a photo of one of my doodlings.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
  2. LC

    LC Member

    Shamus,
    Since I'm not very up to date on this stuff, what is "freehand 9", how does it work and where do you get it.

    Sure looks good, and I need all the help I can get, no good at all in the field of art.

    Thanks,
  3. billk

    billk Active Member

    Here's a picture of a freight house I planned. I also made plan views. I used my QuickCAD program to draw it.
  4. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Hi lc,
    Freehand9 is an art programme designed by Macromedia and is obtainable through any computer shop, quite expensive but well worth it. I draw everything with this programme, including all my Trackplans.
    Billk,
    Love the drawing of the freight house, like to see the floor plan also.
    That Quick CAD program is quite good, does it render 3D after you have drawn the main birds eye view or did you draw it as 3D, I drew up this barrel co, before I scratchbuilt it.

    Shamus
    [​IMG]

    Attached Files:

  5. yellowlynn

    yellowlynn Member

    pictures

    AHA !!! Shamus. Now I know your secret. You draw them up so you know what they will look like before you start. No wonder they always look so good. 'Course, that really doesn't do me any good, I have trouble drawing water out of a faucet. I reckon that leaves me with nothing but being a copycat. Loved that Coopers Barrels building. I'm amassing the materials now to start doing some things like that.

    Lynn
  6. Bob Collins

    Bob Collins Active Member

    Shamus;

    I hope your play on words in naming your barrel company isn't lost on this group:rolleyes: :rolleyes: Tee Hee

    Bob
  7. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    OK, I was kinda slow on the uptake... I had to look it up before I remembered what a cooper was... :)

    -Rory
  8. Bob Collins

    Bob Collins Active Member

    Rory;

    Don't feel bad. Probably the only reason I knew it was that my great-grandfather was a cooper. He worked for years for the Sinclair Barrel Company in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

    I just thought the way Shamus used it was terriffic:)

    Bob
  9. Drew1125

    Drew1125 Active Member

    I would really like to get some of that software!
    I imagine it would be a great aid to scratch building from photographs. Especially for someone like me, who has very little skill in the way of drawing.
  10. billk

    billk Active Member

    Charlie - Not sure how Shamus's Freehand9 compares with the QuickCad I have, but imagine you can do similar things with either. At any rate, I got QuickCad at Menards, believe it or not.
    It certainly fills my needs for making scratch-building plans and for track plannng as well.

    Shamus - QuickCad doesn't convert plan drawings to 3-D, does Freehand9? That would be a neat feature, but no more than what I paid for QuickCad I wouldn't expect to be able to. What it does have is an isometric grid option that I used for the drawing I posted before. I 'somehow' lost the plan drawings, and am in the process of restoring them, will post them when they're presentable.

    In the meantime, here is one of a small trestle 'bent'.
  11. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Hi Billk,
    Freehand9 is quite expensive, on the lines of Paintshop pro7 for price.
    It has hundred's of special features, here is just one of them --
    ----------------------------------------
    The perspective grid is a non-printing array of lines that converge on one or more vanishing points to create the appearance of three dimensions. Use the Perspective tool to snap objects to the perspective grid. Create and modify vanishing points and grid size to control the three-dimensional appearance of the attached objects. Use the Define Grids dialog box to edit and store custom perspective grids and use them to modify other objects.

    Use the Perspective tool to attach objects to the perspective grid. Attach an object to the perspective grid to give it a three-dimensional appearance, which is retained even after the object is released from the perspective grid. Attaching an object to the perspective grid is a two-step process using the Perspective tool and the cursor keys.

    To attach an object to the perspective grid:

    1 Choose View > Perspective Grid > Show to show the perspective grid.
    2 Click the object with the Perspective tool.
    3 Drag the object to the desired area of the perspective grid.
    4 Tap the appropriate cursor key.
    5 Release the mouse button.

    Tap this cursor key To
    Left Attach the object to the left grid.
    Right Attach the object to the right grid.
    Up Attach the object to the floor grid, aligned with the right vanishing point.
    Down Attach the object to the floor grid, aligned with the left vanishing point.
    Note If the perspective grid has only one vanishing point, tap either the left or right cursor key to attach an object to the vertical grid and tap either the up or down cursor key to attach an object to the horizontal grid.

    To alter an object’s perspective appearance, drag the object to a new location on the perspective grid using the Perspective tool. Objects retain their perspective appearance when moved from the grid.

    To Do this
    Flip a side grid object horizontally on the grid 1. Select the object with the Perspective tool.2. Press the spacebar.
    Flip a floor grid object vertically on the grid 1. Select the object with the Perspective tool.2. Press the spacebar.
    Move an object while constraining it to the perspective grid lines Hold Shift while dragging the object. Press Esc to retain the object’s perspective appearance when moving it off of the grid.
    Reduce an object one pixel in both the x and y directions 1. Select the object with the Perspective tool.2. Press the 1 key.
    Enlarge an object one pixel in both the x and y directions 1. Select the object with the Perspective tool.2. Press the 2 key.
    Reduce an object one pixel in the x direction 1. Select the object with the Perspective tool.2. Press the 3 key.
    Enlarge an object one pixel in the x direction 1. Select the object with the Perspective tool.2. Press the 4 key.
    Reduce an object one pixel in the y direction 1. Select the object with the Perspective tool.2. Press the 5 key.
    Enlarge an object one pixel in the y direction 1. Select the object with the Perspective tool.2. Press the 6 key.
    Objects on the grid update automatically when repositioned using the Perspective tool. Moving objects using the Pointer tool or the cursor keys detaches them from the grid.

    Note When View > Snap to Grid is checked, objects moved using the Pointer tool will snap to the Perspective grid but will not automatically obtain a perspective appearance.

    Creating and modifying perspective grids

    The attributes of the perspective grid determine the look of your three-dimensional objects. By defining the number of vanishing points and their positions, as well as the grid cell size, you can alter the viewer’s perspective.

    To activate the perspective grid:

    · Choose View > Perspective Grid > Show.

    · Click the Perspective tool in the Toolbox.

    To create a new grid:

    1 Open the Define Grids dialog box by choosing View > Perspective Grid > Define Grids.
    2 Click the New button.

    The newly created perspective grid appears in the grid list. To change the default grid name, double-click the name and enter a new name. Press Return to accept the new name.

    3 Set the number of vanishing points, grid cell size, and grid color.
    4 Click OK.

    You cannot name a new perspective grid using the same name as an existing grid. To replace a grid in the grid list, first delete the unwanted grid and then create a new one.

    Altering grid attributes

    Change the number of vanishing points and the grid color using the Define Grids dialog box. Alter the grid angles and orientation by clicking and dragging an active grid area with the Perspective tool. The cursor indicates when the pointer is over an active area. For information on the Perspective cursors, see Using FreeHand.

    To Do this
    Hide/show a grid associated with a particular vanishing point Double-click the vanishing point.
    Hide/show the grid floor Double-click the horizon line.
    Add a new grid to the grid list by modifying an existing grid Hold down Option (Macintosh) or Alt (Windows) while moving the grid with the Perspective tool. The new perspective grid appears in the Define Grids dialog with a default name.
    Move grid and attached objects 1. Select the objects to be moved.2. Drag the perspective grid with the Perspective tool while holding the Shift key.
    Move grid and clone all attached objects 1. Select the objects to be cloned.2. Hold down Shift-Option (Macintosh) Shift-Alt (Windows) and drag the grid.
    Removing objects from the grid

    When removing objects from the perspective grid, you can choose to retain or discard the perspective transformation from the object.

    To remove perspective attributes from a grid object:

    1 Select the object with either the Pointer tool or the Perspective tool.
    2 Choose View > Perspective Grid > Remove Perspective.

    To remove a selected object from the grid and retain perspective attributes, choose View > Perspective Grid > Release With Perspective.

    and here's a colour version of the loco.
    Shamus
    [​IMG]

    Attached Files:

    • m4c.jpg
      m4c.jpg
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  12. billk

    billk Active Member

    Shamus - Sounds like a neat SW package (overkill for what I need, though). QuickCAD (or anyCAD, I'd guess) is more along the lines of an 'electronic draftsman'.
  13. Bob Collins

    Bob Collins Active Member

    I'm afraid all this thread has done for me, other than a chance to view the work of some obviously talented people, is to show just how computer illiterate I really am.

    When I first decided to build a layout I purchased 3rd PlanIt, what I understand is a very good CAD program built for model railroad planning. There are all sorts of things you can do with it, but I either lack the patience or the ability, or both to make it work:confused:

    Has anyone else tried and I assumed mastered it?

    Bob
  14. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    I downloaded the demo to 3rd Planit, but it was so unstable on my computer I gave it up. I downloaded RightTrack Freeware 5.0 when Atlas put it out. This program is based on another program called Winrail. It was enough for what I wanted to do with sectional track, but it's very tedious to use for flex track. Other than that, I think it's the easiest program out there. It lacks some of the snazzier features, like 3-D rendering and the ability to run virtual trains on your layout. (You can, however, get a 3-D viewer for Winrail that lets you see your layout from any angle you choose. This works with the RightTrack.)
  15. Bob Collins

    Bob Collins Active Member

    Hi Rory;

    I have always thought that something like 3rd PlanIt or Righttrack were meant to be used to design a layout. I am now thinking that I may try to figure it out once I have my layout completed (does that ever happen?). Then it would be fun to run the virtual trains. It might also be of real benefit in designing scenery, that I'm not so sure about.

    Bob
  16. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Bob,

    I've used RightTrack to plan some of my scenery, especially placement of buildings that I hadn't yet purchased or built. But the library of structures is small, and I don't know of a way to expand it. One solution is to simply draw the buildings yourself. I did that when I was trying to find a place for that new Atlas 3-stall roundhouse. If you already know the dimensions, it's pretty easy to draw out a shape that represents the building.

    The program has also been good for just plain tinkering. It's very easy to use, so I can create a sectional layout pretty quickly. The problem with the flex track is that you have to start and end the section between two pieces of track already set down. Sometimes that's OK because you can simply delete the sectional pieces that you don't want and hook together the flex pieces. You can create custom curved flex track pieces, helixes, and transition curves. But there is no ability to lay flex track freehand.

    Like I said, it's not the snazziest program, but you can't beat the price!

    -Rory

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