Sawdust Empire

Discussion in 'Photos & Videos' started by roryglasgow, Nov 6, 2001.

  1. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    I had to share this photo from a book I've been reading called Sawdust Empire, The Texas Lumber Industry, 1830 - 1940. The book was written by Robert S. Maxwell and Robert D. Baker and is published by the Texas A&M University Press. It's a fantastic book about the lumber industry in East Texas. It discusses the various unique situations faced by early lumber companies, and how they eventually overcame these problems to establish profitable operations. Railroads, significant individuals in the industry, procedures, mills, marketing, conservation, and East Texas history and culture are discussed. The East Texas/Louisiana logging experience was very different from logging in the Northeast and Northwest, and this book does a great job of explaining it all!

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  2. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Love the photo Rory, any more to put up please?
    Shamus
    [​IMG]
  3. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Certainly, Shamus. Here is a photo of Angelina and Neches River locomotive no. 2.

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  4. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Frost-Johnson Lumber Company locomotive. The tender says Louisiana & Arkansas.
  5. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    0-4-2T logging engine. Please excuse the poor quality of the scan. I didn't have my scanner configured properly, and didn't get back to rescan this one.

    It says "Thompson & Tucker Lumber Company" on the side.

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  6. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Shay loco with log train. Note the wooden bumper...

    I don't know who owned it, but apparently it was their locomotive no. 4.

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  7. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    W. T. Carter and Brother Lumber Company Shay no. 2. Also has a wooden bumper. This company ran a popular shortline that featured an ornate passenger coach purchased from a railway in Long Island, New York.

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  8. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Thanks a bunch, I have saved the photo's on my HD, hope thats okay with you.
    I like the shay at the bottom, love the olde worlde type.
    Shamus
    [​IMG]
  9. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Here's the sawmill that's on the front cover of the book. I don't know where it was located. Again, please excuse the poor quality of the scan...

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  10. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    The Nacogdoches (NAK-a-dough-chess) and Southeastern Railroad Company ran a line from Nacogdoches, Texas to Calgary, Texas, where it interchanged with the Santa Fe RR. Here is a timetable, ca. 1928. I found this document particularly interesting because it gave a sense of how long it took to travel that route by train (about three hours with stops, less than one by car nowadays), and it lists some rules of operation.

    Note that not all towns had telephones!

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  11. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

  12. Drew1125

    Drew1125 Active Member

    Great photos Rory!
    Love that little tank engine!
    Also the link & pin couplers. That one Shay (5th photo, I think) has what appears to be a drawbar attached to the front for double heading maybe?
    It's great finding stuff like this isn't it? Very inspirational. That sawmill would be a great little project!
    I think there may be a logging layout in your future Rory! :cool:
  13. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Charlie,

    Yep, I'm definitely going to have a logging and lumber operation! In fact, I'm planning on adding a small logging camp and a small sawmill to my current (small) layout. :) It's very likely that The Next Big Thing will have a more extensive lumber operation.

    I'm sure they double-headed locomotives when necessary. Typical practice, though, was to send one train in the morning to delivery the work crew, load up and return to the sawmill, then send the train back again to pick everyone up and deliver another load. I imagine that there was a rhythm to this where they knew how much power they needed ahead of time.

    I really enjoy finding this sort of stuff out. I didn't know how extensive the lumber industry was in this part of the country. It's given me an entirely new perspective on things--including explaining why the terrain is "just so."

    I used to have these dreams that there was a railroad running in the wood behind the house where I grew up (near Porter, Texas). A few months ago I was looking at U.S.G.S. topographical maps of the area and came across an old rail bed that ran in the woods near my old house! Later investigation revealed that the line was likely owned by the Bender Lumber Company, out of Humble, Texas. I would have never known if I hadn't looked on that map!

    -Rory

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