Printing 2

Discussion in 'Off Topic - Card Modeler Lounge' started by reddwarf, Jul 5, 2014.

  1. reddwarf

    reddwarf Member

    When I print some of the paper models, as I start to put together, they don't match. How do you know what setting to print on.
  2. ASC Mclaren

    ASC Mclaren Member

    That depends. If you are like me (anal about scale), you print to the scale and make it work after. But, I believe that to more correctly answer your question, most card models that I've messed with are designed to be printed on A4 or US letter, if you print at 100%. If you have printed everything at the same time, or using the same setting you should be fine. Without knowing more the specifics that is the best I can offer.
  3. Revell-Fan

    Revell-Fan Co-Administrator Administrator

    *.pdf files are the easiest for printing because they keep their original size. The latest version of Adobe Reader makes it very easy to rescale the pages, too. However, I have found several kits which come in the wrong resolution; if you print them "as is" they come out way too big. Use the "fit to page" option then. The printing dialogue window shows you how the result will look like and enables you to change the settings to avoid any undesired effects.

    Printing bitmap files is a bit trickier. If you use the Windows picture viewer for printing it is mostly not possible to cut out a single piece and print it in the same size / scale (in case you need a specific part again for corrections or modifications). So use a graphic program such as Gimp instead. Load the pic and print it wit Gimp. This allows you to cut out single parts and print them in the same size.

    If the designer has chosen the wrong resolution the image is printed too big or too small. In this case you'll have to change the resolution of the parts page (and save it again).

    However, in some rare cases the resolution of the parts pages differ from each other, even if they come as *.pdf (the Wanderer Class starship by Paragon, for example). Then the parts do not fit and have to be tweaked manually in a try-and-error process.

Share This Page