Platform construction

Discussion in 'FAQs' started by Woodie, Apr 23, 2001.

  1. Woodie

    Woodie Active Member

    All,

    Next on my list is contruction of the station platforms. I have two different scenarios. a single platform on a single track which is required to be straight and constructed on a flat surface. The other is an island platform, again on a flat surface, with one side straight and the other curved. Australian platform prototypes are the height of the carraige door level. How should I build the platform up? what should I use? timber? construct the edges and fill with plaster? Remember I need a specific height. 9/16" above the railhead. (NMRA Standard S7) And what should I surface the platform with to get a good surface to work with?

    Thanks,

    TOOT!
  2. George

    George Member

    This time I've gone for a lower platform, though I like a raised paltform to the door level as you describe in Australia as the rule.

    Some years back when I wanted a raised platform, I found thin paneling scraps that were the correct thickness. I cut them to size and glued them to the bottom of the plastic platform, then glued the wood to the deck. that wood was relatively thin, so I just painted it concrete colour.

    Fast, cheap, effective.

    George.
  3. Woodie

    Woodie Active Member

    Was also thinking about using very thin (1mm) balsa (supported of course). This would give a nice platform overhang (as is the prototype here) together with modelling sand to represent the gravel and bitumen usually on country platforms. Any thoughts? Perhaps not strong enough?

    Thanks,

    TOOT!
  4. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Woodie, a friend of mine who models the British Outline used this method.
    He bought from Ratio the outside plastic brickwork,(Correct height) then made a frame of thin wood and poured in Plaster. When it was dry (over night) he sanded it all down and painted it stone colour.
  5. Woodie

    Woodie Active Member

    Shamus,

    Did he make the mould separate? Pour the plaster, let it set, then place the platform in place? Or did he do it on the layout?

    Thanks,

    TOOT!
  6. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    It was all done away from the layout, I helped him do it.
  7. johan

    johan New Member

    Hello Shamus, thanks for that, yes Shamus did in fact help me with all aspects of model railroads and here is the proof of the Platforms.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
  8. George

    George Member

    Really sharp work, Johan!

    I never thought of it before, but making a platform out of plaster probably is the best way of capturing the textural appearance of the real thing. [​IMG] Did you mix any sand with the plaster?

    13 years ago, I used sanded wood which I painted, but it did not yield the irregularities of the real thing to the eye. I was going to try covering it with a fine layer of sand and then painting it for that gritty look, but then I found a plastic platform from KIBRI that looked more appealing. This time for a new station I am adding, I have selected a generic looking platform with a "V" roof from FALLER which captures a look I like.

    While we are on platforms, and Johan and Shamus have done such a top job on the ones in the photos, let's talk about the issue of curves for a moment.

    An obvious great advantage of building your platforms from scratch is that you can cater their size to fit anywhere, and any desired radius of curve.

    As with an approach to a bridge or tunnel portal, there must be (by my rule of thumb, anyway)at least 6"(15 Cm) of straight track leading in to avoid hitting anything. Same with a raised platform. Long passenger cars with overhang coming off a curve into a station will hit the platform if the structure is too close to the curve. I do not have any experience with curved platforms, so here's my question. HEIGHT. What is your formula and consideration as to platform height to avoid the overhang from colliding with the edge of the platform when entering the station, and what about raised platforms on curves? [​IMG]

    George.
  9. Woodie

    Woodie Active Member

    George,

    I found the NMRA standars fabulous for guageing curves, and distances. NMRA standards 6 & 7 detail all clearances for varoius radius curves, straight track, dual track details distances from outside rail, inside rail and track centres. ie the clearance on the inside rail of a curve needs to be greater than the outside rail, due to the overhang on long rollingstock. The standards also give clearances etc realted to your maximum rollingstock length too. I use the standards religiously for scenery clearance on curves (gullies etc) and haven't had a problem with obstruction yet. (well not yet anyway! [​IMG] )

    TOOT!
  10. George

    George Member

    Thanks guys! I have enough trouble keeping things straight, I think I'll leave the curves to the ladies! [​IMG]

    Now a question for Johan.

    In admiring your photographs above, I noticed that you not only have coloured the sides of the rails, but it would appear you have done the tops as well? My vision isn't the best, but the top looks the same as the side.

    What did you use that does not effect electrical conductivity to the locomotive?

    George.
  11. johan

    johan New Member

    Greatings George,
    I must confess that my friend Shamus has really taught me everthing about model railways, and I mean everthing. The track was ballasted first then the painting of the rails a rust colour, afterwards,dry brush everthing sleepers and rails with a dirty wash of black-brown acrylic paint. When dry, the tops of the rails were cleaned with 1200 wet/dry paper. Thats all there was to it.
  12. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    George, I can answer that about the plaster, no sand was added at all, just used UNDERCOAT plaster with a small amount of white wood glue in with the water to avoid the plaster from cracking at a later date.
    You ask -- - What is your formula and consideration as to platform height to avoid the overhang from colliding with the edge of the platform when entering the station, and what about raised platforms on curves?
    -----
    Raised platforms on a curve can create problems due to the (SOMETIMES) sharpness of model curves. If the curve is no less than 4' radius then there wouldn't be much of a problem keeping the right height for the platforms. On the other hand if the curve is less than 3' radius then you will have to make the height less to stop the cars hitting on the overlap, also make it slightly smaller in height to compensate.

Share This Page