Pine Trees

Discussion in 'Photos & Videos' started by roryglasgow, Sep 10, 2001.

  1. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Hey, everyone! I tried out a new technique I came up with for making pine trees that look like the longneedle trees here in East Texas. I took some dried caspia I got at the hobby shop a few months ago, and snipped off some branches that had the little dried flowers on them. The caspia I bought was purple, so I had to spray-paint it gray and brown. After the paint dried, I dipped the little flowers in white glue, then dipped them in Woodland Scenics Green Grass turf (T45). The result was a very convincing model of a pine tree branch. Caspia branches out (near the ends) similar to the way longneedle branches do. I glued these to a stick of paper-wrapped floral wire. Here is the result:

    [​IMG]

    Sorry for the poor quality of the image. My little digital camera isn't nearly as snazzy as some of those y'all use!

    Anyway, I've found myself a way to make longneedle (and even loblolly) pines. Now it's time to start up the tree factory!

    -Rory
  2. Woodie

    Woodie Active Member

    good looking trees

    Rory,

    Looks good. How long did it take you to make one tree? And you have got how many hundred to go???? :eek:
  3. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Tree Time

    It took a while to make it. I probably spent at least an hour (if not a little more) on this one tree. But the caveat is that in longneedle/loblolly pine forests the trees on the edge are relatively full, with branches fairly near (or reaching down to) the ground; while the interior trees mostly only have branches near the top to catch the sunlight. So, the trees along the edges will be the hardest... But, I'll be mixing these in with some other types of trees that I'll be making out of lichen and Woodland Scenics clump foliage. Another technique I experimented with yesterday was to take some of the bare caspia branches, dip them in white glue, then dip them in course ground foam. These "trees" look similar to some of the deciduous trees in the area, and I can make them very quickly.

    -Rory
  4. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    A better photo

    Here's a better picture of the tree. I didn't think it would be this clear, but discovered by accident that my little camera doesn't do too terribly bad on close-up shots. :)

    [​IMG]

    Also, for your entertainment, here are a couple of paper buildings I put together this weekend:

    [​IMG]

    I still have a lot to do on the town (and the layout in general). As you can see in this picture, I still don't have real streets! Just paper templates that I use for guides...

    Oh, and this photo gives you a good shot of the lovely Couch Mountains in the background. You can see just a little bit of the foothills of the Love Seat Mountains on the right.

    -Rory
  5. Woodie

    Woodie Active Member

    Rory,

    Your tree has come up real good. It will have to take pride fo place next the the new buildings. I have used cardstock kits for buildings as well and also plastic kits. I find they both have their advantages. SUch as printed detail of the cardstock, but limited capacity to kitbash. Texture detail on plastic, but need to detail the kit with paints etc.

    More trees. That's what we need. Start building! We'll fix that greenhouse problem yet! Create Amazonian sized jungles! :)
  6. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Woodie,

    Thanks for the kind words. The reason I got into doing the cardstock buildings was because funds for model railroading are nil at the moment. I pick up kits when I can afford them, but so far those have been few and far between. One of my goals was to develop a method for making decent paper buildings that could at least serve as temporary placements for future plastic kits. I LOVE the DPM town building kits in N scale (and HO, for that matter). The two buildings above were designed using images of the HO scale templates that DPM provides for planning. I reduced them to N scale, make a few modifications and assembled them in Paintshop Pro. Instead of printing them in color, I used colored pencils so I could better control the shading, etc. I'm fairly satisfied with the results of this method (as opposed to other methods I came up with in the past).

    -Rory
  7. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Hi Rory,
    Nice looking tree, what size is it? would make nice fillin's for my Tall Pine country. You say you used "dried caspia " any idea what it's called in the UK, or that a common name for it. I keep on trying to find things to make trees out of. I use "Ming Furn" to make my very tall 18" timbers from drilling holes into balsa wood and inserting the furn.

    Cheers
    Shamus
    [​IMG]
  8. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Shamus,

    This tree is about 5 inches high from the base to the top. That's nearly 67 feet in N scale. Longneedle (aka, "longleaf," but they are longneedle in these parts) and loblolly pines typically grow as high as 80 to 100 feet. They are popular lumber trees, and the longneedles are also tapped for turpentine and resin. There's nothing like the smell of an East Texas pine forest on a hot August afternoon! Well, except for maybe the smell of other pine forests on hot afternoons... Here are a couple of links that describe the two trees:

    http://www.enature.com/fieldguide/showSpeciesGS.asp?searchText=longleaf&curPageNum=1&recnum=TS0046
    http://www.enature.com/fieldguide/showSpeciesGS.asp?searchText=loblolly&curPageNum=1&recnum=TS0055

    Loblollies are not nearly as common in East Texas. They tend to prefer higher elevations. As you drive north or northeast, they become more and more common, eventually outnumbering the longneedles. The two types of tree are very similar in appearance--distinguishing characteristics are the longneedles long needles and the superabundance of pine cones on the loblollies. To me, though, it's a special treat to discover a lone loblolly in the middle of a stand of longneedle pines!

    I don't know of alternate names for caspia. I did a quick search on the web, and the best picture I could come with was this:

    http://flowerweb.com.sg/gsf5.htm

    In this picture, the little grayish flowers are the caspia. I hope this helps!

    -Rory
  9. Matthyro

    Matthyro Will always be re-membered

    Thanks for the great tips and links Rory.
    We all need ways to make better variety of trees.
  10. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Ya learn something new every day!

    Well, I've had a major change-of-thinking event... I picked up a book on the history of the Texas logging industry today at the local library, and to my shock and dismay, I've been mislabelling the pine trees in the area! It turns out that what I have been mistaking for longneedle (longleaf) pines are actually LOBLOLLY pines. And what I thought were loblollies are probably actually SHORTLEAF pines. Although some hybrids exist here and about, longleaf pines are more common a few miles further east. They were heavily logged in Texas and are far less common than they used to be.

    I guess you learn something new every day... :rolleyes:

    -Rory

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