Pine trees, again

Discussion in 'Photos & Videos' started by roryglasgow, Nov 2, 2001.

  1. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    If you haven't already guessed, I have an obsession with trying to make pine trees. My previous construction technique was very time consuming and extremely difficult. I got to thinking about Shamus' tree making method, though, and thought I'd give it a try (with a slightly different spin).

    I whittled down some dowel rods, painted them, and drilled holes for the branches. I used caspia (the branches with flowers) for the branches, and covered those in Woodland Scenics foliage.

    Attached is a photo (with the beautiful Love Seat mountain range in the background). I figure that I can crank out a few of these every night, if I dedicated that much time to them. I can easily do one per night.

    -Rory

    Attached Files:

  2. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Another angle

    Here they are again from another angle:

    Attached Files:

  3. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Rory, Those trees look great, What is "caspia, and how much does it cost, is it dried?
    Might like to get hold of some of that myself.

    shamus
    [​IMG]
  4. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

  5. billk

    billk Active Member

    Hey Rory -
    You make good trees. What did you use to drill the holes into the trunks? I was doing something similar a while ago and tried something that worked pretty well.

    I didn't have a drill that was small enough, and didn't wan't to buy one just for that, so I took an eraser from a mechanical pencil, about 3/16in diameter I would guess, and ran a plain old straight pin through it lengthwise. Then I chucked the eraser into my Dremel and used it like a drill. You gotta make sure the pin is pretty centered, of course. Granted, this won't work on anything but wood, and isn't real precise, but who cares?
    Bill K
    PS What did you use to glue the little sprigs into the holes? And what scale was this?
  6. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Bill,

    I have a little hand drill that I got from Radio Shack a long time ago. I took one of the bits from it (the smaller of the two) and mounted it on the tip of my hobby knife. I kinda got the idea for that after seeing Shamus' mini hand drill in the Academy. I used plain Elmer's white glue to fasten the branches into the holes. And all of this is in N-scale (which is one reason it has been difficult for me to make decent looking trees). I got the idea to use caspia from a recent article in Model Railroader. When I went to the store and actually saw the stuff, I realized that it would make good pine boughs.

    Incidentally, here is the tree that turned on the light bulb:

    http://www.model-trees.com/pine.htm

    After seeing that, I thought about Shamus' article in the Academy and gave it a shot. It it didn't cost me nearly as much as those brass trees!

    -Rory
  7. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Oh, one other thing. Anybody got an idea of how to make the surface of the dowels look like bark? :) I was thinking of trying to press the dowel into a file...if I can find it...

    -Rory
  8. billk

    billk Active Member

    If you use a knife or some other sharp pointed object (you are allowed those, right?) to make "cracks" running the length of the trunk, how does that look?
  9. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    RASP THEM

    Hi Rory, use a rasp to roughen up the dowel to make it look like a tree trunk.
    I used to model in N-scale myself years ago, here's a couple of pics from my old layout. There are some tall timbers I made for N-scale on these photo's.
    Shamus

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  10. Ray Kunz

    Ray Kunz New Member

    Evergreen Trees

    You don't mention your scale but for HO or N the coconut fiber technique seems quite acceptable in representing trees in the second growth areas of the U.S. It is used by many clubs here. I'm not equipped to send photos but will detail our proceedure via email if you want. raykunz@snet.net
  11. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Tall Timbers

    This is H0 scale, Photo's taken from my Badger Creek Lumber Company, they were made from 1/2" balsa dowel - rasped to shape and "Ming Fern" added to the trunks. They are approx. 18"-22" tall.
    Shamus
    [​IMG]

    Attached Files:

  12. Woodie

    Woodie Active Member

    You guys are lucky!

    You guys are lucky! Trees that are nice and symetrical, straight trunks with nice evenly spaced branches. Just drill a hole and stick them in! You try a gnarled old Australian gum tree! Twisted, bent, splits into multiple trunks with no symetry to them at all!

    The best I can do with trees to look like gum trees, is to find some sticks and twigs and stick lichen onto the tips to look like the clumps of leaves etc.

    Attached Files:

  13. Woodie

    Woodie Active Member

    ... and the prototype

    ......... and this is the prototype I'm trying to model! (trees that is, I'll try the bridge and river later!)

    Attached Files:

  14. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Well, Woodie, ya gotta consider that the trees are doing the best they can considering that they're UPSIDE DOWN down there in Australia! :) Might be kinda like the baobab trees...look like someone uprooted them and stuck the limbs into the ground and made the roots into the branches!

    That's a cool scene, too! Whereabouts is that located?

    -Rory
  15. billk

    billk Active Member

    Woodie - Rory might have a point (I thought he was to be kept away from sharp objects). Have you tried digging up various plants and using their roots for your tree trunks and branches?
    Bill
  16. Woodie

    Woodie Active Member

    Upside down?

    If we are upside down, how come the beer still stays inside the glass???? Then again, what good is beer inside the glass? It should be in ya belly!

    For those that are wondering, this is a baobab tree.
    [​IMG]

    I've thought of all sorts of ways to get a proper looking gum tree. Some use the wire from 12 core flex and bend each strand of it to represent the branches, then dip the whole thing in glue and let it set, then paint it. Too much like hard work, so I'd rather use sticks. Haven't thought of using the roots upside down. You'd need a lot of plants for a layout if you did it that way!
  17. billk

    billk Active Member

    Woodie
    I've heard of "foreground" and "background" trees. The foreground trees you put a lot of effort into, lots of details etc., and put them up front where everyone can marvel in your handiwork. The background trees are further away and have little, if any, details. This not only reduces the amount of time spent making the little buggers but heightens the sense of perspective, wouldn't you think?
    Bill
  18. Woodie

    Woodie Active Member

    Trees

    Bill,

    Garahbara is an oval layout on 1.2m * 2.4m board in an island setup. The track sorta goes "around" the scenery as opposed to "through" it. So I don't really have any background parts or areas. I don't really need that many trees (except on the hill bit at one end) so it shouldn't be that difficult or time consuming. It's just getting the practice and the right look.

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