Peco turnouts

Discussion in 'FAQs' started by nscalejim, Nov 25, 2001.

  1. nscalejim

    nscalejim New Member

    Iam using Peco N scale turnouts and have a problem: The Peco switch machine only throws the points one way. If I move the switch machine, then the opposite side is thrown. I have tried to reach a happy medium in moving the machine all over the place, but had no luck. I removed the spring in another turnout, and the switch machine was able to throw it both ways. AM I supposed to remove the spring in all of the turnouts, or am I doing something wrong? Also, I am using 3/4" plywood as a subroadbed to mount the machines...is this ok? Tahnks for any help
  2. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Hi nscalejim, First of all, welcome to the gauge, always nice to see new railroad nuts.

    Now lets see what your problem is.
    Answer me these questions first, then I will solve your problem.

    Are you using the Peco point motor PL10?

    If so, How are you fitting the motor, i.e. to the underside of the point and making a hole for it on the baseboard or are you mounting it under the ply?, and using the long extention to go upto the hole in the point.

    Do not remove the spring, these points rely on the spring for electrical contact. The PL10 (If you are using this) only throws the point to the desired location, it does not power the point.

    Once I know what your are using I WILL put it right for you.
    Cheers
    Shamus
    [​IMG]
  3. nscalejim

    nscalejim New Member

    HI Shamus, I am using the PL10 mounted underneath on the plywood (3/4") I needed to extend the metal pin which I did using the extension rod. If i remove the spring, the points will not have electrical contact? I appreciate your help.
  4. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Hi nscalejim,
    Okay, now I understand the problem.
    Because you are using 3/4" plywood and mounting the PL10's underneath, the extended rod isn't good enough for the thick plywood.
    My advice is to mount the PL10's to the points themselves first, then mark around the PL10 on top of your plywood and cut out a hole to insert it into. Once inserted, place a small amount of masking tape either side of the point to mask the rest of the hole just cut.
    Now the points will work properly, using a 16 volt transformer. You would also be better off using a 24volt ac transformer and a capacitor discharge unit. With this unit in place, you can throw up to 4 points in one go for routing. Plus the fact that you cannot burn out a PL10 using a capacitor discharger.

    Hope this helps, if you need more help, just ask friend.
    Shamus
    [​IMG]
  5. nscalejim

    nscalejim New Member

    Shamus, I will try this...I hope it works. But why is the extension rod so big. Shouldnt this work no matter what size wood I use. I also had to cut off about 1/2" from the extension rod
  6. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Hi nscalejim,

    No need to use the extension rod if you place the PL10's direct onto the points themselves. They are "Surplus to requirements."

    Fit the four prongs through the point holes and bend them over with a pair of pliers.


    Shamus
    [​IMG]
  7. nscalejim

    nscalejim New Member

    Shamus thanks for the help. So far this works just fine. I ll keep you informed
  8. YakkoWarner

    YakkoWarner Member

    Shamus, I am instaling switches on an elevated portion of the layout. (Foam board) I'm having a hard time visualizing what you told nscalejim. Are the switch motors to be surface mounted next to the track? Or put in a hole and then covered up?
  9. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Hello YakkoWarner
    The PL10 motor is fitted onto the point itself and a hole is made in the baseboard the size of the motor and the point/motor inserted. After this apply masking tape to either side to cover up the rest of the hole. Don't forget to paint the tape what ever colour you first painted the baseboards before you laid any track.
    ----------------------------------------
    Here is how it's fitted, top photo showing point & motor -- 2nd photo shows how to bend over the lugs, final photo shows it on a piece of insulation board (Easy to cut)
    Shamus
    [​IMG]

    Attached Files:

  10. YakkoWarner

    YakkoWarner Member

    ok, thanks. It is amazing how much help a picture is.
  11. Cactus

    Cactus Member

    Shamus, your excellent photos and description has convinced me that I ought to use the peco motor to operate one or two turnouts near the back of my layout. I'm currently all-manual when it comes to my turnouts.

    They are all Peco, N-scale. Carving a pit under the turnout is simple, as the layout is 4 inches of extruded styrofoam.

    My questions are, what else do I need besides the PL10 motor and a power source? Do I need a special relay? Does the PL10 come with a toggle switch or something to activate it?

    Thanks.
  12. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Hi Cactus,
    16v transformer is all you really need for the PL10's, but you will need either a passing contact switch for each point or use the Stud and probe method I use along with a Capacitor discharger and 24v ac transformer. This allows you to be able to throw two or three points at the same time.
    How I made my control panel for stud & probe contact is somewhere in the gauge, a search will find it.
    If you need further help, you know where I am.
    Cheers
    Shamus

    Did the search myself for you, here is what I wrote.
    -----------------------------------------
    Making the control panel it 'self, I use two pieces of Perspex the right size for my panel. Next thing to do is draw out the plan on a computer programme to A4 size. When finished I print one copy on plain paper and another on Photo paper at top quality to use as the finished product.
    The first piece of plain paper is used only to provide the places to drill the holes through for the D.P.D.T switches. Mine are 1/4" holes for my switches. (Micro switches) and also where to drill the holes for point control.
    When all drilling is completed, I remove the plain paper and clean up the two pieces of Perspex. Now I insert the new Photo Paper printout and I have a professional looking control panel just waiting to be wired up.
    For my point control I use the stud and contact method utilizing a capacitor discharge unit, which has a 24 volt output for my PL10 point motors which I use to throw the points. The reason I prefer stud and contact over momentary switches (To throw the points) is I only need two tiny nuts and bolts (Brass) fitted to each point on the control panel.
    Here is what my control panel looks like, notice the nuts and bolts, these are my stud and probe contact for changing point direction. You will also notice that I have two switches per block, the reason, I could only buy D.P.D.T without centre off, so I had to put in beside the D.P.D.T.'s a separate on/off switch.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


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