My new Bachmann 3 truck shay

Discussion in 'HO Scale Model Trains' started by Drew1125, Feb 5, 2001.

  1. Drew1125

    Drew1125 Active Member

    Congratulations Shamus! The only thing better than getting a new locomotive is getting one that surpasses your expectations.(I'd take the shay over the Swiss watch any day) [​IMG]
  2. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Hi guys, took delivery this morning of the new Bachmann 3 truck shay. It's a dream, runs like a swiss watch, and quiet as a mouse. I don't know if I dare weather it, at the moment it is running itself in on my layout. Looks superb. Lights back and front, and are directional, and a firebox light WOW.
  3. BobMcD

    BobMcD Member

    Yeah, I hear the Swiss have set a goal of building watches which run as well as the Bachman shay! [​IMG]

    Bob
  4. Rick James

    Rick James New Member

    Charlie,
    Speaking of expectations. I was at a hobby shop and got talking to the owner. He brought out locomotives from all the big names for me. I really like watching the Athearn Gensis run, but the Proto 2000 just blew away everything. My buddy and I watched it run against an Atlas, Kato and Gensis. The proto was best by far, I am definitly sold on them now... these sort of things are good to see when your starting out in MRR like me.
  5. Drew1125

    Drew1125 Active Member

    Rick
    You can't go wrong with the P2k's. I've bought 4 of them in HO & N scales. Nothing else comes close
    I'm off on my adventures in narrow gauge though, & I gotta leave em' behind. [​IMG]
  6. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Thought you all might like to know, the 3 truck shay is now fully weathered. (Doesn't look new anymore damn)
  7. Virginian

    Virginian Member

    Hey shamus,
    Did you take photos, before and after? How about an article on the process and materials for weathering? I know I could find 'how tos' in various publications, but my wallet's a little thin right now, and I've come to 'know' you and value your expertise.
    VGN

    [This message has been edited by Virginian (edited 02-10-2001).]
  8. Virginian

    Virginian Member

    Great, Shamus, thanks!!
    I have just about everything needed.
    One question...there are several types of windshield(windscreen to you [​IMG]) washer fluid..are you refering to ethelene glycol based or??? I use a biodegradable, water based product in my vehicles, and I suspect that wouldn't work.
    VGN

    [This message has been edited by Virginian (edited 02-10-2001).]
  9. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Washing up liquid will do the job also, and cheaper.
  10. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Hi Virginian, Just for you and anyone else interested in a quick and cheap way to weather your bits and pieces.
    WEATHERING WITH CHALKS.
    The weathering of any rolling stock is unfortunately a dirty and messy job, when using chalks. The end results however, justify the little clean up afterwards. So here’s how I do it.
    You will need to obtain from your local Art shop the following coloured chalks. Black - Brown - Grey - Rust (light and dark) - White and yellow - Black Indian Ink.
    Also required from a car accessory shop some windscreen washer fluid. Plus a can of Satin varnish or Matte Varnish from a hobby shop. This gives the final appearance to the finished article.
    Once you have gathered all the items together, a start can be made on weathering that new looking rolling stock you have just bought. You will also need to find an old tin box or two (Old tobacco tins will do, I use plastic cups also) so you can scrape the chalks into them. Before any weathering can be done however, a little cleaning with a soft brush is needed to get rid of any dust which might have settled on the rolling stock. Apart from anything else, the is only one rule to stick to. - Light coloured cars need dark chalks - Dark coloured cars need light chalks.
    The ink wash
    The first thing on the agenda is to spray the car with the satin/matte varnish, this will give the chalks something to grab hold of if you like. Take it outdoors to do it. Once the car has dried (approximately 2 hours) a start can be made to make you car look like it’s been in service for years. With the Indian ink, grab an egg cup (Make sure the wife’s not looking) and put about four drops into the bottom of the egg cup. Now, with the windscreen washer fluid, place about a tea spoon full into the egg cup and mix it all together. An old shaving brush is needed or some soft brush or other to flow the liquid onto the roof and sides of the car. It will run everywhere, but that is exactly what you want it to do. Just keep on stroking the brush down the sides of the car until the effect you require has been achieved. Flow more on the roof from the middle out. Now with a paper towel, dry the brush off and start to wipe off the wash in the same direction you put it on. Once all this has been accomplished, leave it to one side to dry. As it dries, the dark colour of the ink wash will highlight the raised details. (Rivets etc.)
    Right, lets assume that the car has dried, and proceed onto the next stage with the chalks. As I stated earlier, light chalks for dark cars and dark chalks for light cars. So, which ever car you have started needs the appropriate chalk colours. Let’s assume your car is darkish yellow, now, it should, with the after effects of the ink wash, look a little older already so now subtle chalk weathering is needed.
    Chalking
    Scrape some chalks into those tin boxes/plastic cups I asked you to get. I would expect with a dark yellow car that red rust and a little grey and white will be all that is needed for this car. With the shaving brush (Now dry) dip it into the rust chalk and brush lightly over the car trucks and couplers. Use a very small amount of grey and white brushing from the top of the car down in a straight line. This will leave a streaky effect, and is what you are after. When all is done, turn your attention back to the trucks and couplers. Grind up a little rust into the bottom of the egg cup and with a small paint brush dipped into water, then into the rust, brush over the trucks again. Brush on a little at a time, if you get too much on, use a paper towel to take it off.
    All that is left to be done to the car after all the chalks have been applied is to take it out doors and spray it again with the satin/matte varnish, this will seal the weathering for ever. If, as sometimes it does, the spray can has blown some of the chalk away, just re-apply some more chalk and lightly spray again.

    Have fun
  11. Drew1125

    Drew1125 Active Member

    Speaking of using the wife's kitchen utensils, I've found that if you buy nice new ones for her, she'll gladly donate the old ones to the railroad. [​IMG]
  12. Dave Harris

    Dave Harris Member

    I think most W/S washer fluid is alcohol based , ethylene glycol is antifreeze. I use just plain rubbing alcohol, but the W/S fluid might be better as it probably has a bit of soap that could act as a "wetting" agent & improve The flow out. I'll try it , thanks for the idea.

    ------------------
    L V Dave
  13. Dave Harris

    Dave Harris Member

    Sorry, I forgot what the original topic was. I saw my friends new Shay & it's fantastic!I never would have believed Bachman & Lifelike would be producing some of the finest MODELS ,not toys, that we have ever seen & at considerably less than brass prices.

    ------------------
    L V Dave
  14. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

  15. Drew1125

    Drew1125 Active Member

    Nice looking machine!
    Nice looking setting!
    A masterpiece!
    Hats off to you "old chap"! [​IMG]
  16. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Thanks Charlie,
    Now own two of these little beauties, Found it yesterday sitting on a shelf in my local model shop. I was taking some odd loco's and things to part exchange when I spotted this, came away with it for next to nothing really I suppose. I'd had the other stuff quite a long time and it was never getting run because it didn't fall in with my HO logging layout. Damn good job I went down to the shop, otherwise, somebody else would have had that for £130 Cost me with the trade in £40. Definitely in to that, anytime.
    Got the decals on it last night, now I have to weather it, like the other one.

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