model train scenery

Discussion in 'HO Scale Model Trains' started by blurrc2002, Jul 20, 2002.

  1. blurrc2002

    blurrc2002 New Member

    I was also wondering what people use to make the roads for a scale model? I seen some kits that have different types of track which ones are best. I seen some that had a gray in color base under the track is this kind of track ok? I t was like a molded plastic. I think the scale was HO and N. I seen some track also that really looked like a real track. It was O scale. About what size of frame would I need for the scales listed: N? O? HO?
    Is there anything I really need to look for when I buy my model?
    I plan on going to buy one Saturday. Any information is very helpful.

  2. billk

    billk Active Member

    Roads - like you drive on? Depends on what kind - concrete, asphalt, gravel, dirt - but there's a lot of ways to model each.
    Or do you mean the roadbed - the raised surface that the tracks are on. In that case, you can get it molded onto the tracks (see below), or you can buy roadbed made from cork or foam, among other materials, for not much $$.

    You can get 1) track with the base (aka the roadbed) molded in, 2) rigid curved and straight sections without the molded-in roadbed and 3) track that is flexible and can be shaped to any size curve you want. There's advantages to each - cost, ease of use, realism, etc.

    By frame do you mean layout surface, ie the table top or whatever? O takes the most room, N the least, but it depends on how much track you plan to put on it, how large of curves you will use, and about a million other things.

    I'm sure you are chomping at the bit to get something as soon as you can - that's understandable, but my advice is to do some more planning first. Figure out where you're going to put it and how much room you have, then from that what scale would be best.
  3. Drew1125

    Drew1125 Active Member

    Hi Blurrc2002!
    It sounds like you're anxious to get started, & that's great!
    My advice is to get yourself a starter set, which should include train, track, & power pack, & also try to get a beginers book, something like HO Railroading From Set To Scenery (or something like that) This will provide you with everything you need to "get your feet wet", so to speak...The book will give you an overview of several aspects of model railroading...benchwork, types of track, & how to lay track, wiring, & scenery.
    Start small & simple, & you'll find this hobby a most enjoyable way to relax, & be creative.
    Good Luck!

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