Kalmbach Realistic Model Railroad Scenery(how to)

Discussion in 'Getting Started' started by justind, Jul 20, 2001.

  1. justind

    justind Member

    Just wanted to state that as a new modeler, I found this book to be a great read...very straight forward and insightful. If you haven't bothered to read it, do. I look forward to putting some of the principles into practice as soon as possible.

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    ~Justin~
  2. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Funny you should state that Justin, I have just put up in the Buy/Sell forum loads of these to get rid of.

    Shamus
    [​IMG]

    NARA Member #24
    http://www.badger-creek.co.uk
  3. justind

    justind Member

    There you have it, if you haven't read it, Shamus can sell it to you...I especially liked the photo of the small steamer sitting on a turntable at the end of the line at the base of a small mining town perched precariously on a hillside. Based on what I have seen of your layout Shamus, I think it is something right up your alley...I know you wrote it down in an article, but on your pines, what is the name of the fern (or fern-like substance) that you are inserting into the dowels? Oh, I live in Utah, at the base of the Uintah Mountain range and have noticed one thing different in our mountains, the dryer climate of utah tends to dry the pines...the branches sweep upward and grow brittle, instead of seeming to be waited down by the more plentiful rain in Shamus's layout. If you are modeling most of Utah or Colorado, you will notice that the pines have a slight upward sweep to most of them. This isn't something I have really seen in the Sierra Nevada mountains, or anywhere outside of my little neck of the woods. Thought it might be worth mentioning.

    ------------------
    ~Justin~
  4. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    The name of the stuff I use for Pines, varies with what I can get hold of here in the UK, for the most part I use "Ming Fern"
    I have noticed that the pines turn upwards on the real thing, but cannot find any dried stuff to match it.

    shamus
    [​IMG]

    NARA Member #24
    http://www.badger-creek.co.uk
  5. wallace

    wallace New Member

    For Pine Trees, the Woodland Scenics brown plastic "twistable" forms do fairly well, IF:
    You twist them so the (otherwise) flat branches protrude in all directions; you drill holes in the trunk and insert broken toothpicks to add branches near the bottom;
    spray the assemblage GRAY, (very few trees have brown trunks, go look); and use the Woodland Scenics Conifer Foliage (Dark green foam bits on netting) cut into triangular shapes to glue on the "branches". These are less expensive than the metal tree forms.
  6. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Hi Wallace, and welcome to the gauge,
    My Tall Timbers are "Redwoods"
    Shamus
    http://www.badger-creek.co.uk



    [This message has been edited by shamus (edited 07-25-2001).]
  7. justind

    justind Member

    Hi Shamus, I didn't realilze you were modeling Redwoods (I assume you mean like California Redwoods) in which case they are much more realistic. Good job, and that was my mistake.

    ------------------
    ~Justin~
  8. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Hi Justin

    This is just one one type I make, I have around 200 tall timbers ranging from 14" to 20" in height, and between 1/2" and 1" in diam.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    NARA Member #24
    http://www.badger-creek.co.uk



    [This message has been edited by shamus (edited 07-25-2001).]

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