Glue aging trouble

Discussion in 'General Card Modeling' started by Janusz, Mar 9, 2005.

  1. Janusz

    Janusz Member

    Here comes the question:
    Do you have any models made long ago that broke apart.
    Actually I mainly use the UHU liquid glue (in the yellow tube), but many persons advised me against it, saying thet with time it crystalizes
    and the joint comes apart.
    Does anybody know anything about it???
    What about similar risk with glue in sticks like UHU or Pritt,
    I do not use them but I know about people who do.
    Please share your personal opinion about the general problem
    with aging glues and with UHU in particular

    Best regards

    Nihil Supra
  2. Jim Nunn

    Jim Nunn Member


    A few years ago I was cleaning out a closet and found a Paper model that I had built somewhere around 1974. All of the glue joints were in good shape and the model looked as good as the day I finished it. I have always used Elmer’s Glue-All and I am sure that was the glue I used on the model. Along with Elmer’s I now use Aleene’s Original “Tacky Glue†and have used Greven Wiccoll Carton glue and I find it to be a very good all around glue it seems to cause less paper shrinkage. You can order the Wiccoll glue from Lighthouse Model Art, Ralf also has UHU available. I also use Cryo for gluing metal to paper and have used UHU but find it to dry to quickly and I dislike all of the strings that it produces.

    I have tried several glue sticks to laminate card stock to make .5 and 1 mm stock the results were a disaster.

    Jim Nunn
  3. Falcon

    Falcon Member

    Hi Janusz , I'm using Uhu Craft glue for years now and I never had problems.
    I agree with you not to use the glue Sticks.I tried to use Uhu Alles kleber the one your talking about ,but I swiched to Uhu craft glue. :p Why? I just think that nothing is better than Uhu Craft glue!At least here in Thailand .

  4. SCEtoAux

    SCEtoAux Member


    The glues that I have used are:

    Avery Disappearing Color Glue Stic - acid free, photo safe; it is purple until it dries clear. The models that were made using this have not experienced any glue joint failure. Some are at least three years old.

    Elmer's Glue All - white glue; models made using this have not experienced any glue joint failure. Some are at least three years old. I always squeeze a little out of the bottle onto a piece of scrap cardstock and apply it to the tab or part to be glued using a wooden toothpick. That procedure keeps any warping to a minimum. You have to work kind of fast though because the thin coating of glue used will dry fast.

    Aleene's Original Tacky Glue - white glue; models made using this have not experienced any glue joint failure. Some are at least three years old. I use the same procedure as explained in the Elmer's Glue All section. The Aleene's Tacky Glue seems to have less water in it than the Elmer's Glue All. I have been using the Aleene's glue almost exclusively lately.

    UHU Office Pen - clear glue in a yellow tube. It has not been used long enough (only a month) to see if any of the joints will come apart over any significant length of time. I used this on the recommendation from someone who builds hundreds of buildings and props for miniature games and RPG's. I really do not like it, mainly because it does not seem to grab quick enough. It takes a while get the correct application procedure down. Sometimes too much glue comes out and makes a mess.

    These are just my experiences with the glues mentioned. Others probably have quite different results using the same glues. :)
  5. Ashrunner

    Ashrunner Member

    I believe glue joints have a differing life span depending on where you are. I live in central Oregon, which is generally a dry area, with lots of sunshine during the summer. I use Elmer's White Glue, Elmer's School Glue gel, and Aleene's Original and Quick Dry Tacky Glue. I have experienced joint failures in Elmer's White, and both Aleene's glues.

    One windy afternoon here, 90 percent of my models were blown off the shelf and around my kitchen until they ended in a wind covered corner moments later. What I found there was parts of all but one model. The one model which wasn't in pieces, was the only one I knew at the time I had used totally the School Glue Gel. I use both Elmer's in a lot of my models and don't know which parts use which glue. I also use Aleene's on a lot of parts, but never have used Aleene's strictly by itself. But that experience put me in the frame of mind that the School Glue Gel was the only way to go. Since then, that is what I have been using.

    However, I haven't let my models (the few number they are now) flow in the wind either 8v)

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