Canyon Mt. N-gineers Photos (I hope)

Discussion in 'Photos & Videos' started by upguy, Sep 21, 2001.

  1. upguy

    upguy Oregon Western Lines, CEO

    This is primarily a test to see if I can post images, so if they don't appear.... I'm trying a new method. Here goes.... This is supposed to be the LaGrande and Island City portion of the layout. (Union Pacific in NE Oregon)

    [​IMG] Ah, shucks, weren't nothing to it.

    This next picture is a reverse angle of Island City.
    [​IMG]

    This last picture is of the North Powder, Oregon section (lower) and Union, Oregon (upper)[​IMG]

    Now to see if it all works.
  2. roryglasgow

    roryglasgow Active Member

    Looks like a fun layout! I especially like that sweeping curve and the short helix to the lower level in one of the photos on your web page. I bet the trains look great running through there!

    -Rory
  3. upguy

    upguy Oregon Western Lines, CEO

    S-curve of which you speak...

    Actually, the S-curve that you mentioned is now out of sight behind a backdrop that conceals an operator inside the helix. That was not exactly the way it was supposed to be, but that's the way it got built when I was away for a couple weeks. Work is now stalled in that area until it is decided whether to redo that area or live with it. :(

    What is this file attachment??? Guess I'll try it and find out....

    Cool!! Much easier than having to put the picture on my server and then typing in all the URL's.

    Here is a look at a picture that shows where the S-curve is now...behind the grain elevator and the backdrop.
  4. upguy

    upguy Oregon Western Lines, CEO

    I tried to add another attachment, but it didn't work. Then I deleted the one that I did have to add the new one; then I didn't have anything! Worse yet, I couldn't attach anything at all, so I reposted....

    Here is the picture that shows what has now "upstaged" the S-curve.

    Attached Files:

  5. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Hi Upguy,
    Like the layout, should have some great fun adding scenery etc to it. How long did it take you to get this far?

    shamus
    [​IMG]
  6. upguy

    upguy Oregon Western Lines, CEO

    Project start time

    I think that the N-scale layout idea formulated in my brain in January 2000 when I was trying to think of a use for an empty part of my building. It seemed that nobody was interested in renting it, so I decided that if nobody was going to use it...I would use it myself! :p Well, now nobody can rent it because I am filling it with a railroad empire in N-scale. :D
  7. upguy

    upguy Oregon Western Lines, CEO

    This is the Telocaset Module (the S-curve section is right behind the white mountain) showing the latest scenic work. You can see the grandeous (sp?) plan by going to my home page in my member profile. :rolleyes: The ADM grain elevator has been downsized to a smaller, local elevator. (Is that a glacier in the background?)

    Attached Files:

  8. Bob Collins

    Bob Collins Active Member

    The really neat pictures in this thread seem to answer a question I have had about my "next step", but I would appreciate some input/confirmation. I basically have all my track laid with the exception of one spur I will take care of next week. I still have some wiring to do as I changed my mind about just how extensive I wanted to block wire the mainlines of the layout, but always thinking ahead I am starting to look at scenery possibilities.

    I see in this layout that many/most of the buildings and other manmade structures are already put into place. Is that the accepted method of doing this........buildings, etc. first, then conform the terrain/scenery to the space that remains? Makes good sense to me, but I guess I just hadn't really sequesnced it in my mind quite that clearly:D
  9. upguy

    upguy Oregon Western Lines, CEO

    Bob,

    I have placed buildings in various locations to get an idea of just what is going to fit...where. I am not a very accomplished kit-basher of scratch builder, so I have to find an arrangement that will work based on the configuration of the "out of the box" structure. I expect to have to modify some buildings, but I am trying to keep from having to re-design buildings any more than necessary.

    As far as which comes first, the scenery or the buildings, I guess that would probably have to be determined by the situation. I generally find it easier to plan the scenery around the building. However, there may be times when it could be advantageous to construct the scenery first although I think that will increase the difficulty in structure placement because it may force you to adapt a building to fit...thereby requiring kitbashing or scratch building--something that I am trying to minimize or avoid altogether.

    I plan my railroad to be loosely based on the Union Pacific railroad operations in a given time with likely businesses that would have been served by the railroad during that time. I guess that makes me more a "free lancer" and not actually a prototypical modeler of a miniature Union Pacific System. Since I am not as concerned as some individuals would be about everything being prototypicially correct, I don't have to be as fussy about exact placement of structures or landmarks.

    I guess that I'm just trying to keep the modeling that I plan to do within the limits of my modeling ability. Since I am already electrically challenged, I don't need to compound my problems by becoming architectually challenged too.

    Perhaps there are others that are more able to answer the questions that you have raised than I, but I thought I would at least give it a try. Good luck.
  10. Bob Collins

    Bob Collins Active Member

    My thinking is right along the same line as yours. In addition to your idea about placing building, etc. to get the spacing correct, whether or not you are doing proto or free lance( mine is free lance) it helps a great deal to put concept into practice.

    I also like what you did about the grain elevator and I will do exactly the same thing. I looked at the ADM elevator and deecided it was almost too "foram" for the look I want, so I will also look for a local elevator to fit my bill.

    I started out wanting to be true to the UP ( I grew up in the Omaha area and worked in the UP yards one summer as a tinners helper), but now have pretty much decided I'l run whatever the mood makes me want to run. A friend here gave me several Frisco pieces of rolling stock and a diesel engine (my plan was for steam only) and I have found some other things that aren't UP, so I'll try most anything but Amtrak. I do like the idea of doing the scenery to be very rural, regardless of what I run.

    Bob
  11. upguy

    upguy Oregon Western Lines, CEO

    I added another layer to the glacier today. I also worked on the backgrounds which can be seen in some other posts.

    Attached Files:

  12. billk

    billk Active Member

    Hey Upguy - Have you ever considered adding a little color to your plaster when you mix it? It gets rid of the glacier effect (unless that's what you're shooting for), and any chips that happen later on won't be so obvious. Looks like you have a good thing going - a lot of us would like to have a part of an empty building to play with!
    Bill K
  13. upguy

    upguy Oregon Western Lines, CEO

    Plaster will be the next step. The "glacier" is made of styrofoam. ;) I will add a coat of plaster to the surface of the "glacier" to hide any appearance of the layering, and then will come the paint and scenery. I probably will not add color to the plaster. I have tried that before and then the plaster did not set up well, so now I just paint it.
  14. billk

    billk Active Member

    As an experiment a while back I made a diorama using pink foam. After getting it into the shape I was after, I mixed a batch of Durham's Rock Hard Water Putty and added a little water-soluble paint - Woodland Scenics, I think. I used more than the recommended amount of water, it was about as thick as cream. Then I used an old brush, my fingers, or whatever seemed to work and coated the foam with it. It didn't seem to take overly long to get hard, and I was left with a thin, hard, colored shell over the foam. Was pretty pleased with the result.
    Bill K
  15. Bob Collins

    Bob Collins Active Member

    upguy;

    As I look at the pictures here again I am wondering what you use to "cut" the styrofoam into the shapes you want?

    Bob Collins
  16. upguy

    upguy Oregon Western Lines, CEO

    Bob,

    I used a hacksaw blade to make cuts and a "big-toothed" plane (for lack of a proper name) like sheetrockers use. It tends to be a pretty messy job. :rolleyes:
  17. Bob Collins

    Bob Collins Active Member

    Oh, I figured it was messy all right. With just the little bit of sawing I've done so far with my blue board I've creating lots of mess! It looks like you are getting a great base along the slope for later texturing, but I imagine it is time consuming to get the various pieces to "match" on the edge so it doesn't look like you have a series of overhangs evenly spaced down/up the side of the mountain. I will be very interested to see what it looks like when you are ready to show it to the world!!

    Bob
  18. upguy

    upguy Oregon Western Lines, CEO

    This is a picture of my other layout that shows what I hope the scenery will look like when I am done. (This is an HO module, but don't tell anyone.) In this picture there are actually several different methods involved. One is the layered styrofoam (behind the engine, so not too visible) covered with a hard shell and sceniked. Another (along both sides of the river) is hard shell (using plaster saturated paper towels) over woven cardboad strips. Also, I have added plaster rock castings in various places to give added character.

    I have some other pictures of the HO layout. You can look at them by going to my Oregon Western Lines website.

    Attached Files:

  19. Bob Collins

    Bob Collins Active Member

    Looks great. I sure hope I can figure out how to do a good job with the scenery. All the rest is wasted if the scenery isn't right.

    Took a look at your website. That looks great too!

    Bob
  20. upguy

    upguy Oregon Western Lines, CEO

    Thanks, Bob, for the nice comments. There is probably a lot of rust building up on the track on the HO modules since I haven't run the trains there for quite some time. ;) I have been spending 99% of my time working on the N-scale! I have even considered selling my HO stuff. :eek: (I think I'll hold on to it for a while just in case my eyes get too bad for N-scale.) :(

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