Atlas HO30 Morgan Valley

Discussion in 'HO Scale Model Trains' started by watash, Dec 17, 2000.

  1. watash

    watash New Member

    Hey Mike, Welcome to the Board!
    The answers are:
    YES YES YES AND YES!
    Beyond that, its your railroad, your the boss afterall, do what you want! Ha. The narrow gauges do have a number of different rolling stock pieces and track available. You 'can' build one in a garage, but just remember, dust! Make a light weight cover such as a bed sheet that can be put over the whole layout ANYTIME you are not running! I'm sure other guys will have lots of comments to help you too, so I'll wait til you tell us more about what you want your railroad to do. Enjoy [​IMG]
  2. Mike 86

    Mike 86 New Member

    Thanks for your help watash, your help was greatly appreciated. What I basically want to do is make a layout that is realistic to today's train yards. If you or anyone else out there can give me any tips or advice from here, please feel free to tell me. I am also wondering what effect the temperature variation in the garage will have on the track.



    [This message has been edited by Mike (edited 12-18-2000).]
  3. watash

    watash New Member

    Mike, I just discovered something I didn't know, and will pass it along before answering your question. I have been trying to post a photo of my turntable, and it just gets a little square with a red X in it. Everytime I tried to edit py post, it typed out a notice that I had edited my post, at the bottom! I had that stacked up like a ladder! (you have 2) I got mad and erased all the post to delete it. That can only be done by a moderator, BUT, all but one of the "This post has been edited---" lines were gone. So, now if I have to edit a post, I always go to the bottom and delete that notice!See? (After you see this I'll wipe this part out too for you). NOW your question. YES temperature will expand and contract your rails, and any other metals. All you have to do is solder ONE side of a metal rail joiner to ONE rail only. Then solder a loose small wire to BOTH rails. This wire will maintain electrical circuit, yet allow the rails to move as needed, while the joiner keeps both rails in alignment. If you figure about every 6 feet and put the wire in, then you can solder the joiners in between solid. Here in Texas it was 24 degrees last night, but can get up to 100 during the summer, so we have to have some slip, or a big wreck crew and several railroad cranes to put derailed engines back on our track! [​IMG]
  4. Mike 86

    Mike 86 New Member

    I have decided to start this hobby and I was looking at different track layouts. Layout HO30 was one that caught my eye. Is this layout good for a beginner to start out with? And can it be expanded? I also need to know if it is OK to build your layout in a garage. If not could you tell me a more preferable location? Any help or advice will be greatly appreciated.

    [This message has been edited by Mike (edited 12-17-2000).]
  5. shamus

    shamus Registered Member

    Hi Mike
    If you are just looking for some track plans, maybe I can help a little, on my website I have a few track plans I have drawn on the computer which were used in articles in Model Railroading magazine. the website is http://www.badger-creek.co.uk
    Merry Christmas to you and all other readers
  6. Mike 86

    Mike 86 New Member

    Another concern I have about building my layout in my garage is the affect that moisture will have on it. Wouldn't this moisture cause the wood to warp or could it affect the performance of the trains or track? If anyone has any advice on how to approach or solve this problem please let me know, Thanks.
  7. watash

    watash New Member

    Mike, I have had several layouts in different garages, and have one operating in what would be a garage if I didn't have the layout in it now. When it rains, I keep the doors closed. In fact, the only time I keep the big door open, is when I am moving a layout in or out, or an old player piano, or piece of machinery, or am using my table saw etc. Always, ALWAYS, I put the dust cover on the layout BEFORE I open the big door, and every time I stop running the trains, NO EXCEPTIONS! I have never had any trouible with rainning outside, snow, dust,or temperature changes. The only trouble I have ever had so far of an unusual nature, was a couple of times a large beetle (bug), crawled onto the track and derailed a cheap plastic Bachmann diesel passenger train. The other time, a big black stink bug got on the track, facing the on coming train, ducked his head when it got to him and the cowcatcher slid right up over his back. That engine weighed around 3 pounds and was on a test run with the gear covers off. It ground poor old bug to goo and parts of him jammed the gears before I could reach the throttle to stop it. Other than the stink, the engine was being made, so was no problem to have to clean up, and nothing was damaged, It was all solid lead and brass. Your greatest threat to a layout in a garage, is going to be someone else driving a car, bike, tricycle, ar lawn mower into the legs. Another possible problem would be a child or visitor leaning on the table, or someone temporarilly sitting something on it they want you to put away in storage when you have time or get home from work. Or, some dumb *** could aim a garden hose into the garage and wet down the layout to help your trees grow! Mice and rats will eat or gnaw at plastic rolling stock, and make nests in your houses unless you get rid of them first, just keep a 30-30 handy (if you live in Texas), they get big as rabbits here! Like I say, beyond that, you shouldn't have any trouble with a garage layout!!ENJOY IT [​IMG]
  8. Mike 86

    Mike 86 New Member

    Watash, I would like to thank you for all the advice you have given me about building my layout in my garage. And for all the other questions you have answered, Thanks [​IMG]

    Mike
  9. watash

    watash New Member

    Mike, I'm sure you could learn a lot from Shamus if you ask him. You should go over and look around his layout. You two have a lot in common about narrow gauge type layouts, and Shamus has some neet tricks he has worked into his scenery too. I have been at it many years, but more on the professional museum and display end than the hobby end, so although I have had some layouts, mine tend to get pretty technical and you may not want to put that much mechanism into a layout just to run trains. Shamus is probably more an artist from the finished looks of his work, so he can guide and advise you along lines I would just marvel at. See? If I have helped you, your welcome. I'll be sculking around in my cave if you need me, just shout, whistle, or offer food, and I'll come lopping across the field sniffing and slobbering all the way! [​IMG]
  10. Drew1125

    Drew1125 Active Member

    I'm a little confused by Mike's original posting.
    Mike, do you mean HOn30? Or is HO30 the number for a track plan?
    I was assuming you meant narrow gauge, until you said something about a "today's type rrain yard". There's nothing modern about a 30" gauge RR. Not in the U.S. anyway.
    If you are interested in HOn30, check out Bob Hayden's Carabasset & Dead River Ry. in the Sept. 98 Model Railroader.
  11. Drew1125

    Drew1125 Active Member

    Sorry, I'm an idiot.
    I just realized Mike WAS talking about an ATLAS track plan.
  12. BobMcD

    BobMcD Member

    Mike,

    As for a "track plan with realistic yards", you might want to read John Armstrong's book "Track Planning for Realistic Operation", which tells a lot about how a railroad works and how to model one. Have fun!

    Bob

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